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Tag Archives: Nazi-Sexploitation

A new and pathbreaking collection of studies has come out, the first book which addresses systematically the neglected field of Nazisploitation. Many chapters deal with the Holocaust theme in Exploitation cinema, especially in Italian Sexploitation films from the late 1970s. A detailed review will follow as soon as possible, in the meantime we offer the description from the publisher’s website:

Nazisploitation! examines past intersections of National Socialism and popular cinema and the recent reemergence of this imagery in contemporary visual culture. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, films such as Love Camp 7 and Ilsa, She-Wolf of the SS introduced and reinforced the image of Nazis as master paradigms of evil in what film theorists deem the ‘sleaze’ film. More recently, Tarantino’s Inglourious Basterds, as well as video games such as Call of Duty: World at War, have reinvented this iconography for new audiences. In these works, the violent Nazi becomes the hyperbolic caricature of the “monstrous feminine” or the masculine sadist. Power-hungry scientists seek to clone the Führer, and Nazi zombies rise from the grave.

The history, aesthetic strategies, and political implications of such translations of National Socialism into the realm of commercial, low brow, and ‘sleaze’ visual culture are the focus of this book. The contributors examine when and why the Nazisploitation genre emerged as it did, how it establishes and violates taboos, and why this iconography resonates with contemporary audiences.

Table of Contents

“Nazisploitation: An Introduction” by Daniel H. Magilow

Part I. Origins, Histories, and Genealogies
1. Cinema beyond Good and Evil? Nazi Exploitation in the Cinema of the 1970s and its Heritage by Marcus Stiglegger
2. Sexual Deviance and the Naked Body in Cinematic Representations of Nazis by Michael Richardson
3. Ilsa and Elsa: Nazisploitation, Mainstream Film, and Cinematic Transference by Alicia Kozma
4. Reproducing the Fourth Reich: Cloning, Nazisploitation, and Revival of the Repressed by Elizabeth Bridges
5. Utterly without Redeeming Social Value? “Nazi Science” Beyond Exploitation Cinema by James J. Ward

Part II. Bitches, Whores, and Dominatrices
6. The Third Reich as Bordello and Pig Sty: Between Neodecadence and Sexploitation in Tinto Brass’s Salon Kitty by Robert von Dassanowsky
7. Revisiting the Cruel Apparatus: Disability, Queerness, and Taste in In a Glass Cage by David Church
8. Eine Armee Gretchen: Nazisploitation Made in Switzerland by Benedikt Eppenberger
9. Meshes of Power: The Concentration Camp as Pulp or Art House in Liliana Cavani’s The Night Porter by Elissa Mailänder

Part III. Heroes, Villains, and the Undead
10. Digital Nazis: Genre, History and the Displacement of Evil in First-Person Shooters by Jeff Hayton
11. Captain America Lives Again and So Do the Nazis: Nazisploitation in Comics after 9/11 by Craig This
12. A Past that Refuses to Die: Nazi Zombie Film and the Legacy of Occupation by Sven Jüngerkes and Christiane Wienand
13. Messing Up World War II-Exploitation: The Challenges of Role-Play in Quentin Tarantino’s Inglourious Basterds by Mimmi Woisnitza
14. Of Blitzkriege and Endlösungen: The Resurrection of a Dead Genre? by Michael Fuchs

Bibliography
Selected Filmography
Notes on Contributors
Index

Four book covers inspired from the “Salome sequence” of the controversial film The Night Porter (“Il portiere di notte”, Liliana Cavani, 1974). The Charlotte Rampling character, Lucia Atherton – a concentration camp survivor who has a sadomasochistic relationship with the former Nazi SS officer Maximilian Theo Atdorfer (Dirk Bogarde) – has become the symbol of the eroticization of the Holocaust, and has heavily inspired the subsequent Nazi-Sexploitation cinema mostly produced in Italy in the late 1970s.

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